The Queen’s Vegan Pledge: Creating a sustainable Queen’s for all

Queen’s Animal Defence, with the Food Portfolio of Queen’s Engineers Without Borders, is excited to announce the launch of a new initiative: the Queen’s Vegan Pledge. This initiative has its own dedicated website, Facebook page and Instagram profile.

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What is the Queen’s Vegan Pledge?

There are lots of good reasons to go vegan. People variously change their diet for the planet, for human health and, of course, for the animals. Inspired by the success of initiatives like Veganuary and Animal Aid’s Great Vegan Challenge, the Queen’s Vegan Pledge encourages Queen’s – from students to staff, from societies to departments – to go vegan for the month of March. The Queen’s Vegan Pledge will provide the encouragement people need to take a manageable step towards veganism in a supportive environment, and a voice in support of vegans at Queen’s University. We hope that many of our pledgers – after seeing how easy and enjoyable veganism can be – will choose to stick to a vegan diet after the completion of the month. Continue Reading

New Poster Series: Animals Call for Help

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In QAD’s latest poster series, animals contact the ‘barbaric practices snitch line’ to speak out about the terrible things that happen to them in the biomedical labs at Queen’s.

Generally, when people talk about ‘cruel’ or ‘barbaric’ practices inflicted on animals, they are thinking in terms of actions that reflect a deviant individual personality (as in sadistic acts of torture), or practices of foreign or minority cultures (such as cockfighting). In Canadian law animal cruelty is defined in a way that exempts “generally accepted” cultural and economic practices. This means that animal farmers, trappers, slaughterhouse workers, scientific researchers and countless others can harm animals in horrific ways, while enjoying complete legal impunity, because their actions are classified as “generally accepted’ instances of animal use. If I, as an ordinary individual, sever a cat’s spinal cord to render her lame, or strap a monkey in restraints and deny her water to make her work for me, or deliberately induce bleeding in a hemophiliac dog, I am guilty of a crime. If a Queen’s researcher does these things, it’s considered a generally accepted scientific practice, or business as usual.

The goal of the barbaric practices poster series is to redirect the language of barbarism/cruelty away from minority practices, and aim it where it belongs, at routine, institutionalized violence against animals.

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QAD profiled in new online magazine Animal Liberation Currents

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“But thousands of animals still live out their lives in barren cages in the windowless basement of Botterell Hall, subject to horrific procedures in the name of science, deprived of all that makes life worthwhile, and hidden from public view by a high security apparatus.”

Animal Liberation Currents just released QAD’s profile on their website, highlighting the history of animal activism at Queen’s University and the current work Queen’s Animal Defence is doing.

Excerpt:

For 3 years, faculty and students have challenged vivisection at a major biomedical research institution in Ontario. Their struggles highlight the challenges in activism for animals on campus and the greater politics of animal research.

Read the entire piece here.

Kingston VegFest, a Smashing Success!

One of our members at our table at Kingston VegFest.

One of our members at our table at Kingston VegFest with some of the flyers and posters we’ve been using over the past few years.

Kingston’s inaugural VegFest was a huge success on Saturday. Congratulations to all of the organizers and participants!

QAD’s table was hopping with visitors from 11:00 to 5:00. Some were new to our efforts on behalf of animals at Queen’s; others dropped by just to let us know that they follow our activities via the website and Facebook page and to express appreciation for our work. Thank you to everyone who stopped to chat about their experiences in life science studies, their deep concern for animals confined to labs, and their desire to make a difference.

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